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Confirmations

Confirmation Overview

Confirmation is the sacramental rite in which candidates express a mature commitment to Christ and receive strength from the Holy Spirit through prayer and the laying on of hands by a bishop.

In Confirmation, we proclaim to ourselves, to the church, and to the world that we know what it means to be a Christian and commit to walking through life in love with Jesus. Importantly, this sacrament is not a destination or ending point, but rather a stepping stone in a journey of lifelong formation.

Jessica Rockowitz Photography
Jessica Rockowitz Photography

Youth Confirmation

Confirmation continues the good work that our Baptism began. At Good Shepherd, our Confirmation class incorporates the unconventional with the orthodox, holding space for our doubts and our divinity, and providing the space to discover new ways of encountering Christ. Through small group discussions, weekly readings, a retreat, and various guest speakers, this nine-month journey will help youth uncover what it means to be a Christian and an Episcopalian.
At the conclusion of the class in spring, confirmation is offered to all high school students who feel called to make a mature confession of faith.

Adult Confirmation

In the Episcopal tradition, Confirmation is a public, adult affirmation of your baptism. To be received means you have been baptized in another denomination, and you want to be received by the bishop into the Episcopal Church. Reaffirmation is for those who have already been baptized and confirmed, but feel drawn to make a public reaffirmation of their faith.

We welcome seekers of all backgrounds, as each of these rites is open to ALL adults who desire to take this step.

Required preparation classes for those intending to be confirmed, received or reaffirmed explore the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer, church history, liturgy and the Episcopalian faith.

If you are interested in becoming confirmed or learning about upcoming Confirmation classes, please contact us.

About confirmation in the Episcopal Church